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2845 Thornhills Avenue Southeast
Grand Rapids, MI, 49546

616-301-5366

Do you want to burn fat & lose weight? Build muscle & get stronger? Crosstrain for running, biking or swimming? Or hike to Machu Picchu? Everything starts with a detailed assessment of your current physical condition. Our system measures your lean muscle mass, body fat, strength levels and other biomarkers. 

Based on the latest exercise science, Koko's proprietary algorithms create a unique strength, cardio & nutrition program precisely tailored to your body and goals.

Our Smartraining equipment leads you through every single workout, pushing you harder with real-time instruction, interactive coaching and performance data.

Koko synchronizes to your body, dynamically modifying the volume and intensity of your workouts as you progress, for maximum results without plateaus.

Every workout is different, never boring. Koko's friendly staff & encouraging community celebrate your milestones, both in-club and online.

Every session is tracked automatically on your own personal, data-rich website. Check in anytime from any of your devices.

 

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Koko FitClub of Grand Rapids, Michigan

Koko FitClub of Grand Rapids, Michigan. Official Blog.

Getting healthy is the best way to make time for YOU

Randall Wysong

Wood, Michael., 10 May 2017, Retrieved from: "The Stronger Blog"

Sometimes all we need in life, is to stop and take care of ourselves before we can focus on everything else. Whether you are unhappy with who you are, how you look, or how you feel, you should always take the time for yourself.

 

After being home with my kids for nearly 14 years and dedicating myself to their growth, I had put on 34 pounds of weight and dreaded buying new clothes or looking in the mirror.

After going back to work full-time, I began to experience serious prolonged anxiety and depression – overall I didn’t feel very good about myself. I started KoKo merely as an occasional outlet but nothing serious. After being back in the workforce for about 1.5 years, I realized I needed to do a restart. I quit my job and for the next six months, I focused my time on myself for a change.

A big part of that was feeling good about ME and wanting to look in the mirror again. I started a daily routine of working out at Koko to include both cardio and strength followed on bringing back healthy eating for both me and my family.

Six months later, I had dropped 24 pounds and had tons of energy – and best of all built a lifestyle that I wanted to continue. I have kept the weight off – and although I don’t work out everyday any more, Koko has provided me with an easy outlet for reducing stress and anxiety while keeping the weight off.

Going back to work no longer was filled with anxiety; I feel good about myself!

Bonnie
Certified KokoNut

Stay Koko Fit!

Michael Wood, CSCS
Chief Fitness Officer, Koko FitClub

About Michael Wood, Chief Fitness Officer
Michael Wood, CSCS, is Chief Fitness Officer at Koko FitClub, driving the development of integrated strength and cardio training and nutrition programs for Koko members nationwide. A nationally acclaimed fitness expert, Michael has conducted research as a Senior Exercise Physiologist at the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Sarcopenia Laboratory at the Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, and has lectured at Boston University and the University of Connecticut. He has been named Boston Magazine’s “Best of Boston” Personal Trainer, and made the Men’s Journal “Dream Team” list of the nine best trainers in the U.S. Michael and his family live in Cape Cod, MA.

The Difference Between Muscle Tissue and Body Fat MAY 8, 2017 / MICHAEL WOOD, CSCS, CHIEF FITNESS OFFICER

Randall Wysong

The body is an amazing organism and is made up of many different elements, including various tissues, bones, organs and fluid. The two that we seem to focus on the most, when it comes to exercise and our health, are muscle and fat. We exercise and monitor our nutritional intake to build one, muscle, while trying to lose the other, fat (also known as adipose tissue).

Click here to view the original article.

Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in the body accounting for approximately 42% and 35% of body weight in men and women respectively. An average male who weighs 185 pounds would have about 78 pounds of lean muscle tissue while a female who weighs 140 pounds has approximately 49 pounds of lean muscle tissue. The remaining body weight, once muscle and fat are accounted for, includes water, mineral, bone and organ weight (the average human heart weighs about 10 oz. while the brain weighs about 3 lbs.). That same average male that where talking about may have, on average, about 25% body fat (or 46 pounds of fat) while that average female may have 30% body fat (or 42 pounds of fat).

One of the amazing things about muscle tissue is that it has the ability through regular, progressive exercise, to increase in size (known as muscle hypertrophy). Donnelly and colleagues have reported that strength training studies (lasting from 8 to 52 weeks) have shown increases of 2.2 to 4.5 pounds of muscle mass. On the other hand, fat tissue typically decreases in size when an exercise prescription is consistently followed. In addition to increasing in size, muscle can also get stronger and with additional training, improvements can be seen in endurance capacity, power output and force production as well.

Fat is stored in the body in the form of triglycerides and also stored in fat cells which are called adipocytes. According to Coyle, about 50,000 to 60,000 calories of energy are stored in fat cells throughout the body. Fat can also be stored within skeletal muscle cells. Protein stores in muscle can account for about 30,000 calories of energy. Muscle tissue can contribute approximately 20% of the body’s total daily energy expenditure compared to 5% for fat tissue.

The photo shows equivalent amounts of both muscle and fat (5 lbs.) but the same amount of muscle, which is more dense, takes up one-third less space compared to fat. Five pounds of muscle and fat may in fact weigh the same but that is where the similarities end. Muscle tissue, pound for pound, requires 3-4 times more calories to maintain compared to fat and is important in the process of energy metabolism. A pound of metabolically active muscle tissue requires 5-7 calories per pound while fat tissue is less metabolically active, needing about 2 calories per pound.

Finally, muscle plays an important role in the aging process. With advancing age we experience a loss of exercise capacity. This is due to first, to a decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength during aging and then a decrease in maximal oxygen uptake mainly due to a drop in maximal heart rate, according to Henning Wackerhage, PhD, a Senior Lecturer in Molecular Exercise Physiology at the University of Aberdeen.

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Michael Wood, CSCS
Chief Fitness Officer, Koko FitClub

About Michael Wood, Chief Fitness Officer
Michael Wood, CSCS, is Chief Fitness Officer at Koko FitClub, driving the development of integrated strength and cardio training and nutrition programs for Koko members nationwide. A nationally acclaimed fitness expert, Michael has conducted research as a Senior Exercise Physiologist at the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Sarcopenia Laboratory at the Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, and has lectured at Boston University and the University of Connecticut. He has been named Boston Magazine’s “Best of Boston” Personal Trainer, and made the Men’s Journal “Dream Team” list of the nine best trainers in the U.S. Michael and his family live in Cape Cod, MA.

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References

Marieb, EN and Hoehn, K. (2010). Human Anatomy and Physiology (8th ed.). San Francisco: Benjamin Cummings.

Elia, M. (1999). Organ and Tissue Contribution to Metabolic Weight. Energy Metabolism: Tissue Determinants and Cellular Corollaries. Kinney, J.M., Tucker, H.N., eds. Raven Press. New York.

Donnelly, J.E., Jakicic, J.M., et. al. (2003). Is Resistance Training Effective for Weight Management Evidence-Based Preventive Medicine. 1(1): 21-29.

Wackerhage, H. (2014). Molecules, Aging and Exercise in Molecular Exercise Physiology. Routledge.

Coyle, EF. (1995). Fat metabolism during exercise. Sports Science Exchange, 8(6):59.

Mud Run season is here and more people than ever are using this coaching system to get ready / MICHAEL WOOD, CSCS, CHIEF FITNESS OFFICER

Randall Wysong

Here is a truly remarkable KokoNut! Meet Charles, a 3 time Spartan Race vet who loves to train at Koko!

So last year I decided to cross out a bucket list objective of running a Mud Run before I turned 50 and lost the ability to make it happen.  I trained hard and completed not one but THREE Spartan Races in 2015, earning the coveted Spartan Trifecta!  It was a difficult achievement and a dream come true, but no matter how hard I trained each one seemed to kick my butt a little harder, but I did finished it!

So how do you follow that up when you turn 50?  Well you do it TWICE that’s how!  Here is a pic from the Dallas Beast on Sunday, which completes my first of two 2016 Trifectas.  27 combined miles and 75 combined obstacles later I accomplished half my goal.  What did Koko do to get me there?  It made me FASTER.  I cut considerable time off each of the previous years time’s.  In addition to being faster, Koko made me STRONGER.  Out of 75 obstacles, I only failed 6 in 2016.  Again, that was half the failures of 2015.  Not to mention, I blew through the penalty burpees that almost crippled me in 2015. The CONDITIONING Koko has provided as given me the strength to preserver.  For example after the 2015 Beast, I spent over 24 hours in the bed and did not make it back to the gym for over a week.  This year I got up at 7 a.m. on Sunday and helped a friend move for 11 hours AND I was back in the gym after 2 days!

Will I stop there?  No way!  I have another Spartan race in Alabama on November 19th and two more in Florida on December 10th and 11th for a total of six races in 2016!  That’s KoKo STRONG.  Thank you for ALL you do to keep us all moving forward and achieving our dreams.  When I started KoKo, my doctor told me he wasn’t sure which one, Diabetes or a Heart Attack would take me out first but if I didn’t change my lifestyle I wouldn’t live to see my kids graduate from High School.  Now he pumps me for fitness tips when I have a check up because he “hasn’t seen anything like this before.”  I could not have done it without Koko.  Barbara’s non-stop inspiration and the Monthly Challenges keep me coming back everyday when all I want to do it get a little extra sleep.  I tell everyone 50 is the new 30 

Attached is a picture of me proudly flying my Koko flag at the finish line with my Trifecta Medals.  You are more than welcome to use it or any part of this to help or motivate others.

Thanks for ALL you guys do!

Charles
Certified KokoNut

There you have it.

Stay Koko Fit!

Michael Wood, CSCS
Chief Fitness Officer, Koko FitClub

About Michael Wood, Chief Fitness Officer
Michael Wood, CSCS, is Chief Fitness Officer at Koko FitClub, driving the development of integrated strength and cardio training and nutrition programs for Koko members nationwide. A nationally acclaimed fitness expert, Michael has conducted research as a Senior Exercise Physiologist at the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Sarcopenia Laboratory at the Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, and has lectured at Boston University and the University of Connecticut. He has been named Boston Magazine’s “Best of Boston” Personal Trainer, and made the Men’s Journal “Dream Team” list of the nine best trainers in the U.S. Michael and his family live in North Attleboro, MA.

The Long-Reaching Effects of Taking Care of Yourself APRIL 19, 2017 / MICHAEL WOOD, CSCS, CHIEF FITNESS OFFICER

Randall Wysong

Now this is a cool story! We always celebrate our amazing Koko members as frequently as possible.

Sherry is not your average KokoNut and her story extends far beyond personal results. Check it out…

My parents were both smokers who I begged to stop smoking from the age of 5. I’d give them pamphlets about the effects of smoking, was miserable when both smoked in the car, and wanted to convince them to stop. This was in the 1960’s when the research was finally revealed about how bad it was for the smoker but secondhand smoke hadn’t been researched.

My dad died at 47 of a heart arrhythmia that certainly was exacerbated by nicotine as a stimulant. I miss him everyday. My mom has COPD and emphysema. I started exercising diligently about 30 years ago and recognized the sound scientific principles behind the Koko concept. I have the same cardiomyopathy as my dad and a low ejection fraction which has improved by almost 20% since starting HIIT training at Koko.

I love exercising this way and look forward to going every other day. My profession as an exercise physiologist was shaped by my passion to educate others about the effects of nutrition and exercise on our health. In the early 80’s I helped start one of the first cardiac rehab programs in MI after my father died. This opportunity led to research in left ventricular dysfunction and sharing with cardiologists in China and throughout the US.

The hospital I worked for gave me the opportunity to get a Ph.D in this field and I am thankful. Educating others about lifestyle changes continues to be a passion of mine so I appreciate the Koko FitClub sound scientific principles. Thank you!

Sherry
Certified KokoNut

A history of pre-existing conditions and a passion for exercise physiology led Sherry to Koko FitClub. She believes in effects of proper nutrition and training for movement, just like us! Life and fitness is all about balance.

Stay Koko Fit!

Michael Wood, CSCS
Chief Fitness Officer, Koko FitClub

About Michael Wood, Chief Fitness Officer
Michael Wood, CSCS, is Chief Fitness Officer at Koko FitClub, driving the development of integrated strength and cardio training and nutrition programs for Koko members nationwide. A nationally acclaimed fitness expert, Michael has conducted research as a Senior Exercise Physiologist at the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Sarcopenia Laboratory at the Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, and has lectured at Boston University and the University of Connecticut. He has been named Boston Magazine’s “Best of Boston” Personal Trainer, and made the Men’s Journal “Dream Team” list of the nine best trainers in the U.S. Michael and his family live in North Attleboro, MA.

Overcoming Injury: How Joe’s Physical Training Prepared Him for an Unexpected Issue APRIL 12, 2017 / KYLE DEMARCO, FITNESS LIFE CORRESPONDENT

Randall Wysong

We try to brag about our amazing members as much as possible. This week we celebrate a wonderful KokoNut of our who was able to handle a very problematic health issue because of his training at Koko.

 

Meet Joe…

I started Koko FitClub on a trial basis…

I had tried a lot of diets and exercise routines but nothing seemed to stick. When I tried Koko, it fit into my busy schedule and the convenience of computer assistance and instruction made the effort seamless!

I have now been a KokoNut for over 3 years and during that time my doctor and I have noticed the marked improvement in my physical health. Just as important though, is my mental well-being.

Being fit also has an added benefit of mental toughness and the body’s ability to handle stress. This year has been a challenge with several people close to me passing away. In addition, some health issues arose. While in the emergency room for the stone, all my vital systems remained normal which amazed the attending nurses especially because I was perspiring profusely from the pain.

I attributed my body’s ability to handle the situation to my Koko routine and explained that to the nurse. She said that whatever the reason, I should continue to do it. All i all, everything turned out okay.

Most people attribute Koko as physical fitness but I learned it also contributes immensely to one’s mental fitness, allowing the body to handle the stresses associated with life’s everyday challenges.

Thank you Koko FitClub!

Joe
Certified KokoNut

Joe was able to take what he learned at the gym and apply it to an every day situation, albeit uncommon. Endurance and focus are huge when getting fit, and being able to apply that focus and endurance during a stressful situation makes Joe a true KokoNut!

Stay Koko Fit!

Kyle DeMarco
Fitness Life Correspondent

Stay Connected with Koko!
2845 Thornhills Avenue Southeast
Grand Rapids
Michigan
49546
United States